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Parasite biodiversity faces extinction and redistribution in a changing climate

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
256 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
Title
Parasite biodiversity faces extinction and redistribution in a changing climate
Published in
Science Advances, September 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1602422
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colin J. Carlson, Kevin R. Burgio, Eric R. Dougherty, Anna J. Phillips, Veronica M. Bueno, Christopher F. Clements, Giovanni Castaldo, Tad A. Dallas, Carrie A. Cizauskas, Graeme S. Cumming, Jorge Doña, Nyeema C. Harris, Roger Jovani, Sergey Mironov, Oliver C. Muellerklein, Heather C. Proctor, Wayne M. Getz

Abstract

Climate change is a well-documented driver of both wildlife extinction and disease emergence, but the negative impacts of climate change on parasite diversity are undocumented. We compiled the most comprehensive spatially explicit data set available for parasites, projected range shifts in a changing climate, and estimated extinction rates for eight major parasite clades. On the basis of 53,133 occurrences capturing the geographic ranges of 457 parasite species, conservative model projections suggest that 5 to 10% of these species are committed to extinction by 2070 from climate-driven habitat loss alone. We find no evidence that parasites with zoonotic potential have a significantly higher potential to gain range in a changing climate, but we do find that ectoparasites (especially ticks) fare disproportionately worse than endoparasites. Accounting for host-driven coextinctions, models predict that up to 30% of parasitic worms are committed to extinction, driven by a combination of direct and indirect pressures. Despite high local extinction rates, parasite richness could still increase by an order of magnitude in some places, because species successfully tracking climate change invade temperate ecosystems and replace native species with unpredictable ecological consequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 256 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 158 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 22%
Researcher 31 20%
Student > Bachelor 25 16%
Student > Master 24 15%
Unspecified 12 8%
Other 32 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 86 54%
Environmental Science 22 14%
Unspecified 21 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 3%
Other 12 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 449. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2018.
All research outputs
#16,898
of 12,271,071 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#154
of 2,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#997
of 267,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#8
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,271,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,377 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 126.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,952 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.