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Nighttime light data reveal how flood protection shapes human proximity to rivers

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
Title
Nighttime light data reveal how flood protection shapes human proximity to rivers
Published in
Science Advances, August 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aar5779
Pubmed ID
Authors

Johanna Mård, Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Maurizio Mazzoleni

Abstract

To understand the spatiotemporal changes of flood risk, we need to determine the way in which humans adapt and respond to flood events. One adaptation option consists of resettling away from flood-prone areas to prevent or reduce future losses. We use satellite nighttime light data to discern the relationship between long-term changes in human proximity to rivers and the occurrence of catastrophic flood events. Moreover, we explore how these relationships are influenced by different levels of structural flood protection. We found that societies with low protection levels tend to resettle further away from the river after damaging flood events. Conversely, societies with high protection levels show no significant changes in human proximity to rivers. Instead, such societies continue to rely heavily on structural measures, reinforcing flood protection and quickly resettling in flood-prone areas after a flooding event. Our work reveals interesting aspects of human adaptation to flood risk and offers key insights for comparing different risk reduction strategies. In addition, this study provides a framework that can be used to further investigate human response to floods, which is relevant as urbanization of floodplains continues and puts more people and economic assets at risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 99 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 26%
Researcher 19 19%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 2 2%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 26 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 21%
Engineering 17 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 12%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 33 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 110. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2019.
All research outputs
#237,441
of 18,593,253 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#1,691
of 6,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,714
of 288,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#73
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,593,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,945 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 119.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,381 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.