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When lives are put on hold: Lengthy asylum processes decrease employment among refugees

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
85 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
99 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
166 Mendeley
Title
When lives are put on hold: Lengthy asylum processes decrease employment among refugees
Published in
Science Advances, August 2016
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1600432
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jens Hainmueller, Dominik Hangartner, Duncan Lawrence

Abstract

European governments are struggling with the biggest refugee crisis since World War II, but there exists little evidence regarding how the management of the asylum process affects the subsequent integration of refugees in the host country. We provide new causal evidence about how one central policy parameter, the length of time that refugees wait in limbo for a decision on their asylum claim, affects their subsequent economic integration. Exploiting exogenous variation in wait times and registry panel data covering refugees who applied in Switzerland between 1994 and 2004, we find that one additional year of waiting reduces the subsequent employment rate by 4 to 5 percentage points, a 16 to 23% drop compared to the average rate. This deleterious effect is remarkably stable across different subgroups of refugees stratified by gender, origin, age at arrival, and assigned language region, a pattern consistent with the idea that waiting in limbo dampens refugee employment through psychological discouragement, rather than a skill atrophy mechanism. Overall, our results suggest that marginally reducing the asylum waiting period can help reduce public expenditures and unlock the economic potential of refugees by increasing employment among this vulnerable population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 85 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 166 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 166 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 25%
Student > Master 28 17%
Researcher 20 12%
Student > Bachelor 15 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 26 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 71 43%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 27 16%
Psychology 10 6%
Arts and Humanities 7 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 3%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 31 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 198. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2019.
All research outputs
#108,244
of 17,605,869 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#887
of 6,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,016
of 271,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#25
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,605,869 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 119.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.