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Article Metrics

Global sea turtle conservation successes

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
114 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
reddit
3 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Global sea turtle conservation successes
Published in
Science Advances, September 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1600730
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonios D. Mazaris, Gail Schofield, Chrysoula Gkazinou, Vasiliki Almpanidou, Graeme C. Hays

Abstract

We document a tendency for published estimates of population size in sea turtles to be increasing rather than decreasing across the globe. To examine the population status of the seven species of sea turtle globally, we obtained 299 time series of annual nesting abundance with a total of 4417 annual estimates. The time series ranged in length from 6 to 47 years (mean, 16.2 years). When levels of abundance were summed within regional management units (RMUs) for each species, there were upward trends in 12 RMUs versus downward trends in 5 RMUs. This prevalence of more upward than downward trends was also evident in the individual time series, where we found 95 significant increases in abundance and 35 significant decreases. Adding to this encouraging news for sea turtle conservation, we show that even small sea turtle populations have the capacity to recover, that is, Allee effects appear unimportant. Positive trends in abundance are likely linked to the effective protection of eggs and nesting females, as well as reduced bycatch. However, conservation concerns remain, such as the decline in leatherback turtles in the Eastern and Western Pacific. Furthermore, we also show that, often, time series are too short to identify trends in abundance. Our findings highlight the importance of continued conservation and monitoring efforts that underpin this global conservation success story.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 114 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Researcher 7 21%
Other 4 12%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 50%
Environmental Science 13 38%
Unspecified 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 490. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,798
of 8,755,789 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#81
of 1,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#654
of 236,624 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#10
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,755,789 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,461 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 124.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,624 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.