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U.S. Pacific coastal wetland resilience and vulnerability to sea-level rise

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
59 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
148 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
223 Mendeley
Title
U.S. Pacific coastal wetland resilience and vulnerability to sea-level rise
Published in
Science Advances, February 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aao3270
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Thorne, Glen MacDonald, Glenn Guntenspergen, Richard Ambrose, Kevin Buffington, Bruce Dugger, Chase Freeman, Christopher Janousek, Lauren Brown, Jordan Rosencranz, James Holmquist, John Smol, Kathryn Hargan, John Takekawa

Abstract

We used a first-of-its-kind comprehensive scenario approach to evaluate both the vertical and horizontal response of tidal wetlands to projected changes in the rate of sea-level rise (SLR) across 14 estuaries along the Pacific coast of the continental United States. Throughout the U.S. Pacific region, we found that tidal wetlands are highly vulnerable to end-of-century submergence, with resulting extensive loss of habitat. Using higher-range SLR scenarios, all high and middle marsh habitats were lost, with 83% of current tidal wetlands transitioning to unvegetated habitats by 2110. The wetland area lost was greater in California and Oregon (100%) but still severe in Washington, with 68% submerged by the end of the century. The only wetland habitat remaining at the end of the century was low marsh under higher-range SLR rates. Tidal wetland loss was also likely under more conservative SLR scenarios, including loss of 95% of high marsh and 60% of middle marsh habitats by the end of the century. Horizontal migration of most wetlands was constrained by coastal development or steep topography, with just two wetland sites having sufficient upland space for migration and the possibility for nearly 1:1 replacement, making SLR threats particularly high in this region and generally undocumented. With low vertical accretion rates and little upland migration space, Pacific coast tidal wetlands are at imminent risk of submergence with projected rates of rapid SLR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 59 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 223 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 223 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 17%
Researcher 37 17%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 5%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 42 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 62 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 32 14%
Engineering 16 7%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Other 15 7%
Unknown 58 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 195. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2021.
All research outputs
#152,319
of 21,735,696 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#1,245
of 8,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,019
of 295,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#41
of 227 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,735,696 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,881 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 120.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 227 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.