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Corporate control and global governance of marine genetic resources

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
154 Mendeley
Title
Corporate control and global governance of marine genetic resources
Published in
Science Advances, June 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aar5237
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Blasiak, Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, Colette C. C. Wabnitz, Emma Sundström, Henrik Österblom

Abstract

Who owns ocean biodiversity? This is an increasingly relevant question, given the legal uncertainties associated with the use of genetic resources from areas beyond national jurisdiction, which cover half of the Earth's surface. We accessed 38 million records of genetic sequences associated with patents and created a database of 12,998 sequences extracted from 862 marine species. We identified >1600 sequences from 91 species associated with deep-sea and hydrothermal vent systems, reflecting commercial interest in organisms from remote ocean areas, as well as a capacity to collect and use the genes of such species. A single corporation registered 47% of all marine sequences included in gene patents, exceeding the combined share of 220 other companies (37%). Universities and their commercialization partners registered 12%. Actors located or headquartered in 10 countries registered 98% of all patent sequences, and 165 countries were unrepresented. Our findings highlight the importance of inclusive participation by all states in international negotiations and the urgency of clarifying the legal regime around access and benefit sharing of marine genetic resources. We identify a need for greater transparency regarding species provenance, transfer of patent ownership, and activities of corporations with a disproportionate influence over the patenting of marine biodiversity. We suggest that identifying these key actors is a critical step toward encouraging innovation, fostering greater equity, and promoting better ocean stewardship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 221 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 154 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 154 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 21%
Researcher 28 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 13%
Other 12 8%
Student > Bachelor 11 7%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 25 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 35 23%
Social Sciences 23 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 5%
Other 23 15%
Unknown 41 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 469. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2021.
All research outputs
#31,681
of 17,944,828 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#369
of 6,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,062
of 288,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#20
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,944,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,679 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 119.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.