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City-level climate change mitigation in China

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
133 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
201 Mendeley
Title
City-level climate change mitigation in China
Published in
Science Advances, June 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aaq0390
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuli Shan, Dabo Guan, Klaus Hubacek, Bo Zheng, Steven J. Davis, Lichao Jia, Jianghua Liu, Zhu Liu, Neil Fromer, Zhifu Mi, Jing Meng, Xiangzheng Deng, Yuan Li, Jintai Lin, Heike Schroeder, Helga Weisz, Hans Joachim Schellnhuber

Abstract

As national efforts to reduce CO2 emissions intensify, policy-makers need increasingly specific, subnational information about the sources of CO2 and the potential reductions and economic implications of different possible policies. This is particularly true in China, a large and economically diverse country that has rapidly industrialized and urbanized and that has pledged under the Paris Agreement that its emissions will peak by 2030. We present new, city-level estimates of CO2 emissions for 182 Chinese cities, decomposed into 17 different fossil fuels, 46 socioeconomic sectors, and 7 industrial processes. We find that more affluent cities have systematically lower emissions per unit of gross domestic product (GDP), supported by imports from less affluent, industrial cities located nearby. In turn, clusters of industrial cities are supported by nearby centers of coal or oil extraction. Whereas policies directly targeting manufacturing and electric power infrastructure would drastically undermine the GDP of industrial cities, consumption-based policies might allow emission reductions to be subsidized by those with greater ability to pay. In particular, sector-based analysis of each city suggests that technological improvements could be a practical and effective means of reducing emissions while maintaining growth and the current economic structure and energy system. We explore city-level emission reductions under three scenarios of technological progress to show that substantial reductions (up to 31%) are possible by updating a disproportionately small fraction of existing infrastructure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 201 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 201 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 21%
Student > Master 33 16%
Researcher 25 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Student > Bachelor 8 4%
Other 32 16%
Unknown 51 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 35 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 19 9%
Social Sciences 15 7%
Engineering 11 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 5%
Other 37 18%
Unknown 74 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 150. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2021.
All research outputs
#183,570
of 20,106,890 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#1,404
of 7,762 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,092
of 294,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#66
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,106,890 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,762 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 121.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.